What Millennials Really Believe About Religious Liberty

LifeZette.com earlier this month ran an eye-opening story regarding what millennials think about religious freedom. According to LifeZette, more than nine out of 10 support First Amendment rights and religious freedom, but the results may not be as clear-cut as they first seem.

The Fund for American Studies conducted the survey as part of its “Support for Freedom Index,” and some are saying the findings may reflect a different understanding by millennials of what freedom really is.

Consider interviewing author and religion/culture expert Dr. Alex McFarland (www.AlexMcFarland.com) on what he has heard about religious freedom from the tens of thousands of young people he’s spoken to over his 20-plus-year career.

McFarland is the co-author of the new book, “Abandoned Faith: Why Millennials Are Walking Away and How You Can Lead Them Home,” which sheds new light on what Christian parents must do to reach their young adult children when it comes to matters of faith, and also offers a strong voice of hope for church leaders, employers and others who serve and love the millennial generation.

LifeZette further reported, “the ‘93 percent of millennials who support religious freedom’ number appears to come solely from those who strongly support or somewhat support the statement: ‘Government should not interfere with the peaceful religious practices of Christians, [Muslims], Jews and other faiths.’ Along similar lines, the ‘90 percent of millennials who support free speech’ appears to come from those who strongly support or somewhat support the statement: ‘Students with unpopular opinions should be able to express their thoughts without fear of punishment.’”

LifeZette also published the story: “Faith and Millennials: Bringing Them Back into the Fold,” highlighting McFarland’s “Abandoned Faith.”

To book Dr. Alex McFarland for interviews, contact Beth Harrison at 610-584-1096, ext. 104, Media@HamiltonStrategies.com, or Deborah Hamilton at 215-815-7716 or 610-584-1096, ext. 102.