American Heritage Girls Differs from Girls Scouts USA—Here’s How

AHG is the Character-Development Program That Emphasizes Christian Values, Family Involvement and More 

May 10, 2021

CINCINNATI, Ohio Devoted parents and caregivers of daughters will be thrilled to know that American Heritage Girls (AHG, www.americanheritagegirls.org) offers faith-based, scout-type, experiences for girls that include badge programs, service projects, leadership opportunities, outdoor adventure, and more—all with an emphasis on Christian values and family involvement.

Compare the Christ-centered AHG with Girl Scouts USA. While the Girls Scouts also offer outdoor experiences, by the Girl Scouts’ own description—they encourage troops to use “inclusive” language and gender-neutral pronouns to help provide a “safe space” for children. They “pride” themselves on this, they say. The Girl Scouts want their members and volunteers to be allies of the LGTBQ community. A recent blog post—titled “Gender Diversity: Help Your Troop Feel Happy and Safe”—indicates the group’s woke agenda.

AHG, by contrast, builds up young girls by speaking biblical truth to them—and by teaching them to value themselves as they were made in God’s image. AHG believes in Imago Dei (the Image of God)—that God, in His wisdom, created man and woman with unique roles and responsibilities. This is something the transgender community, among others, is fighting against today.

AHG Founder and Executive Director Patti Garibay is wholeheartedly focused on providing authentic, positive and values-driven outdoor activities and many other character and leadership development opportunities for girls all across the country—and she stands steadfastly against the woke agenda so prevalent in today’s secular culture.

“Girls are eager to learn,” Garibay said. Yet unlike at American Heritage Girls, the “Girl Scouts are teaching girls as young as seven years old that gender can be non-binary,” she noted.

AHG’s mission is to build young women of integrity through service to God, family, community and country. It offers comprehensive badge and patch programs, as well as level awards for participants who show superior dedication to learning and participation.

The Stars & Stripes Award, for example, is the highest recognition available to an American Heritage Girl. The award teaches girls perseverance, self-respect, project management and leadership skills.

“Over the last two decades, I have noticed that girls who work to earn the award due to a ‘real calling’ rather than ‘an expectation’ have experienced the greatest lessons that I am sure will last a lifetime,” said Garibay.  

American Heritage Girls was founded in 1995 by a group of parents who wanted a faith-based, scout-type character development program for their daughters. American Heritage Girls across the nation and the globe participate in badge programs, service projects, leadership opportunities, and outdoor experiences, all with an emphasis on Christian values and family involvement.

In addition to the biblically based parenting advice shared in the Raising Godly Girls blog and Raising Godly Girls radio features that are heard on 770 radio stations, American Heritage Girls provides a community experience in a Troop setting. Girls benefit from Christ-centered friendships and mentors to assist them in becoming godly girls.

Today, there are troops in all 50 states and in 15 countries around the globe through the Trailblazer Program. A variety of Christian denominations are also represented as Charter Organizations for Troops. Thousands of volunteer members across the country are helping girls to grow in their faith, cultivate a heart for service, enjoy the great outdoors, and have more fun than they can imagine.

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To schedule interviews with Patti Garibay, founder and executive director of American Heritage Girls (AHG, www.americanheritagegirls.org), contact Media@HamiltonStrategies.com, Marjorie Pratt, 610.584.1096, ext. 107, or Deborah Hamilton, ext. 102.